Joomla TemplatesBest Web HostingBest Joomla Hosting

In order to view this object you need Flash Player 9+ support!

Get Adobe Flash player
Joomla! Slideshow
Click on the slide!

Agriculture

From Rediscover Nigeria desk

  AGRICULTURE   The wealth of a nation is partially measured by its ability to guarantee its citizenry food security.In…

More...
Click on the slide!

Manufacturing

From Rediscover Nigeria's Desk

Manufacturing in Nigeria concentrates mainly on the production of consumer goods. With a population estimated today at over 156 million…

More...
Click on the slide!

Nigeria! Overview

About rediscovernigeria! >> About us

From Rediscover Nigeria's Desk

Tourism in Nigeria has huge potentials to be a major foreign exchange earner. The Obasanjo administration has created awareness among…

More...
Click on the slide!

Nigeria's Resources

Image taken from the movie "Transformers"

Nigeria's total verified external debts as at December 2010 was US$4.578 billion as against US$3.947 billion in 2009. Total scrutinized…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow (version 1.7.2) - Copyright © 2006-2008 by JoomlaWorks
Rediscover Nigeria Education

Education

EDUCATION

Out of the entire social sector in Nigeria, education suffered the most in the many years of military rule. It appeared as if there was a deliberate policy to completely destroy the sector. The effect was immediately noticeable through the brain drain that hit the economy and the drop in the quality of education offered in public schools. Educational institutions were almost always closed. The physical infrastructure available at all levels became dilapidated. Primary school teachers went on for months without salaries. Secondary school students resorted to massive fraudulent practices to pass examinations while tertiary institutions were in and out of strikes arising from disputes between both academic and non-academic staff with the Federal Government. Students spent their idle time engaging in all vices including cultism through which they unleashed terror on fellow students.

GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION IN 1999

To correct this deplorable state, the Universal Basic Education Scheme UBE, was launched in 1999 and it continues as a cardinal focus of the Transformation Agenda. The first target was to renovate infrastructure especially classrooms and to bring in students who were studying more under trees. As a result, furniture is now being supplied to schools so as to create a conducive learning atmosphere.

School enrollment has improved since the launching of the UBE though many children of school age are still out of classrooms.

 

EDUCATION BASIC DATA 1999 – 2003

 

Description

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Students in Primary School (‘000)

23,710

24,849

27,385

29,152

31,825

25,464

Students in Secondary School (‘000)

6,057

6,359

6,995

7,753

8,035

6,343

Students in University equivalent (000) +

185.5

208.6

215.5

228.2

249.7

267.5

Students in University equivalent (000)

399.8

488.2

481.8

518.0

597.5

621.4

Source: The Nigerian Statistical Fact Sheet on Economic and Social Development.

 

+University equivalent includes institutions like polytechnics and specialized tertiary institutions which admit students who have acquired at least secondary school education.

A close look at the data reveals that primary school enrollment increased by only 11.5% in the first two years but by above 34% in the year 2003 (Four years after the introduction of the Universal Basic Education).

Secondary school enrollment equally improved by 15.4% in the first two years and 32.6% in the year 2003. Universities had 20.5% more students in the first two years and 49.4% more after four years. With training for more than 4,000 teachers and fresh recruitment, the ratio of teacher/pupil may still not have reached impressive levels in public schools.

 

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

Teachers in Primary School (000)

456

461

489

510

599

Teachers in Secondary School (000)

159

155

175

190

206

Teachers in University (000)

17.5

19.4

20.8

22.3

23.4

Source: National Bureau of Statistics.

 

The data available here presents a ratio of one teacher to 51.9 pupils in 1999, to 56 pupils in 2001 and 53 in 2003.

In secondary schools, it was one teacher to 38 students in 1999, to 39.9 students in 2001 and the same level of 39.0 in 2003.

TERTIARY EDUCATION

In October, 2009 the Federal Government licensed an additional seven (7) tertiary institutions.  This brought the total number of tertiary institutions in Nigeria 103.

This comprised 27 Federal, 35 State, 34 Private Universities, and the additional 7.  The present administration has in (2010) licensed another 6 universities for the six geo-political zones.

Notwithstanding the increase in the number of schools, the rate of absorption is still low.  In the 1980s and 1990s, enrolment grew between 12% and 15%.  Government funding however dropped.  The value of recurrent expenditure per student dropped by 62% between 1990 and 1997.  While enrolment grew by 79%, government allocations fell by 27%.

In 2009, 400,000 university applications were received without a corresponding increase in intake capacity.  In 20009/10 session, public universities admitted 138,000 new students while private universities enrolled 32,000 new students.

The salaries of academics may have improved since 1999 but it has not stemmed the tide of the brain drain making it necessary to work out a sustainable wage structure in the comprehensive framework for funding education.

 

GROWTH OF UNIVERSITIES 1948 – 2010

 

PERIODS

FEDERAL

STATE

PRIVATE

TOTAL LICENSE

1948

1

-

-

1

1950-1959

-

-

-

-

1960-1969

4

-

-

5

1970-1979

8

7

-

20

1980-1989

9

2

-

31

1990-1999

3

5

3

42

2000-2006

1

17

21

81

2007-2009

1

4

17

103

TOTAL

27

35

41

103

2010

6

-

-

109

Source: National Universities Commission (NUC)

 

FUNDING

The basic shortcoming of education in Nigeria is funding as the nation's universities in the past had world ranking and attracted the best academics from all over the world. While the country grapples with a myriad of other problems, funding for education has to be substantially increased while some social services currently enjoyed free could attract fees to enable funds to be freed to support education.

THE TRANSFORMATION AGENDA AND EDUCATION

The Federal Government's priority is to allocate massive resources in the medium term economic framework (2012-2015) to develop Human Capital. While other sectors may be able to bear the pressure of inadequate funding, education represents the key to Human Capital development which cannot be sacrificed for anything. Proposed allocation to Education over the period is as follows:

 

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total (2012-2015)

N9.850 bn         (Approx. US$65.66 million)

 

N100 bn

(Approx. US$666.66 million)

N106.5 bn

(Approx. US$710 million)

N128 bn

(Approx. US$853.33 million)

N344.350 bn

(Approx. US$2.295 milion)

Source: The Transformation Agenda

 

SPECIALISED TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS

Of immediate relevance to the economy are tertiary institutions which offer practical courses in the sciences particularly in the area of agriculture, food technology, engineering, computer and information technology, architecture, geology, medicine and the areas of human capital development that can lead to self employment and wealth creation.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Vocational education has almost disappeared from the programmes of both Federal and State Governments. The existence of this window of educational institutions is largely responsible for the bulk of self employed Nigerians who had no access to higher education in the immediate past. Technical schools for skill acquisition along with trade and crafts schools have a very relevant role in a developing economy. The private sector, religious organizations, non-governmental organizations and donor agency support will help to re-introduce this level of education in Nigeria.

OPPORTUNITIES

Neighbouring countries like Ghana, Benin Republic and Togo including South Africa have reaped bountifully from the challenges facing the educational sector in Nigeria. The elite in Nigeria are increasingly sending their children and wards to educational institutions in these countries not minding the cost. In Nigeria, there is a rise in the number of schools offering high quality education at primary and secondary school levels comparable to what obtains anywhere in the world and they are getting patronage.

 

1183 guest(s) read this Article today!

 
Activity Stream
 
Banner